Results of the vote on an extension to Article 50

by Politicker

A motion to determine an extension to the Article 50 period ending at 11:00pm on 29 March 2019 was debated on 14 March 2019 in the House of Commons.

That this House:

(1) notes the resolutions of the House of 12 and 13 March, and accordingly agrees that the Government will seek to agree with the European Union an extension of the period specified in Article 50(3);

(2) agrees that, if the House has passed a resolution approving the negotiated withdrawal agreement and the framework for the future relationship for the purposes of section 13(1)(b) of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 by 20 March 2019, then the Government will seek to agree with the European Union a one-off extension of the period specified in Article 50(3) for a period ending on 30 June 2019 for the purpose of passing the necessary EU exit legislation; and

(3) notes that, if the House has not passed a resolution approving the negotiated withdrawal agreement and the framework for the future relationship for the purposes of section 13(1)(b) of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 by 20 March 2019, then it is highly likely that the European Council at its meeting the following day would require a clear purpose for any extension, not least to determine its length, and that any extension beyond 30 June 2019 would require the United Kingdom to hold European Parliament elections in May 2019.

Various amendments to the original motion were debated and voted on

Amendment proposed: (h), to leave out from first “House” to end and add

“instructs the Prime Minister to request an extension to the Article 50 period at the European Council in March 2019 sufficient for the purposes of legislating for and conducting a public vote in which the people of the United Kingdom may give their consent for either leaving the European Union on terms to be determined by Parliament or retaining the United Kingdom’s membership of the European Union.”.—(Dr Wollaston.)

This amendment is asking for another referendum

Result of the vote on this amendment:

Ayes: 85 Noes: 334 (AMENDMENT DEFEATED)

The Conservative MPs (301) and DUP (10) remained united in this vote.

Labour MP’s abstained (most of them) from this vote on the basis that it was not the right time to consider another referendum, however 25 Labour MPs did vote in favour and 18 Labour MPs did vote against.

Manuscript amendment proposed: (i), leave out from “Article 50 (3)” to end and add

“to enable the House of Commons to find a way forward that can command majority support;

2. orders accordingly that on Wednesday 20 March—

(a) Standing Order No. 14(1) (which provides that government business shall have precedence at every sitting save as provided in that order) shall not apply;

(b) precedence shall be given to the motion specified in paragraph 3;

(c) the Speaker shall interrupt proceedings on any business before the motion specified in paragraph 3 at 1.30 pm and call a Member to move that motion;

(d) debate on that motion may continue until 7.00 pm at which time the Speaker shall put the questions necessary to dispose of proceedings on that motion including the questions on amendments selected by the Speaker which may then be moved;

(e) any proceedings interrupted or superseded by this order may be resumed or (as the case may be) entered upon and proceeded with after the moment of interruption; and

3. the motion specified in this paragraph is a motion in the name of at least 25 Members, including at least five Members elected to the House as members of at least five different parties, relating to the Business of the House on a future day or days in connection with matters relating to the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union.”—(Hilary Benn.)

The next vote was on this amendment to the amendment (i)

Amendment proposed to manuscript amendment (i): before “to enable the House of Commons”

add “for a period ending on 30 June 2019”.—(Lucy Powell.)

Amendment (i) attempts to wrest control of the Brexit process from the Government.

Result of the vote on this amendment to amendment(i) :

Ayes: 311 Noes: 314 (AMENDMENT DEFEATED)

16 Rebel Tories voted against the Government line as follows:

  • Bebb, Guto
  • Benyon, rh Richard
  • Boles, Nick
  • Clarke, rh Mr Kenneth
  • Djanogly, Mr Jonathan
  • Freeman, George
  • Greening, rh Justine
  • Grieve, rh Mr Dominic
  • Gyimah, Mr Sam
  • Halfon, rh Robert
  • Lee, Dr Phillip
  • Letwin, rh Sir Oliver
  • Sandbach, Antoinette
  • Soames, rh Sir Nicholas
  • Stevenson, John
  • Vaizey, rh Mr Edward

This vote was followed by a vote on Amendment (i) itself with the following result

Ayes: 312 Noes: 314 (AMENDMENT DEFEATED)

15 Rebel Tories voted against the Government line as follows:

  • Bebb, Guto
  • Benyon, rh Richard
  • Boles, Nick
  • Clarke, rh Mr Kenneth
  • Djanogly, Mr Jonathan
  • Freeman, George
  • Greening, rh Justine
  • Grieve, rh Mr Dominic
  • Gyimah, Mr Sam
  • Lee, Dr Phillip
  • Letwin, rh Sir Oliver
  • Sandbach, Antoinette
  • Soames, rh Sir Nicholas
  • Stevenson, John
  • Vaizey, rh Mr Edward

Amendment proposed: (e), leave out paragraphs (2) and (3) and add:

“(2) notes that this House has decisively rejected the Withdrawal Agreement and Framework for the Future Relationship laid before the House and the proposition that the UK should leave the European Union without a Withdrawal Agreement and a Framework for the Future Relationship; and

(3) therefore instructs the Prime Minister to seek an extension to Article 50 in order to avoid exiting the EU on 29 March without a ratified Withdrawal Agreement and a Framework for the Future Relationship; and to provide parliamentary time for this House to find a majority for a different approach.”.—(Jeremy Corbyn.)

This amendment is calling for an extension to Article 50 in order to renegotiate the Withdrawal Agreement and Framework for the Future Relationship.

Result of the vote on this amendment:

Ayes: 302 Noes: 318 (AMENDMENT DEFEATED)

1 Rebel Tory voted against the Government line as follows:

  • Clarke, rh Mr Kenneth

Amendment (j) was not put to a vote.

The Motion (without any amendments) was then voted on with the result

Ayes: 412 Noes: 202 (Motion Agreed)

Interesting to see how the votes went…

Only 112 Conservatives voted in favour of their own motion together with the majority of other MPs.

188 Conservative and 10 DUP MPs voted against the motion (seeking no extension and presumably a “no-deal” scenario.


Information obtained from Hansard

https://hansard.parliament.uk/