web analytics

Category Archives

19 Articles

The European Council May 2016 to June 2018

Striving for unity: The European Council, May 2016 to June 2018, report by President Donald Tusk. This report details the work of the European Council, where the leaders of the European Union meet, from May 2016 to June 2018.

Striving for unity: The European Council, May 2016 to June 2018, report by President Donald Tusk

The report shows how the Union’s political unity was maintained and strengthened in the face of multiple threats and challenges: unprecedented migratory pressures, shifts in geopolitics, a sustained terror threat, an uncertain economic outlook and the decision by British voters to leave.

From 2016 to the present, Europe’s leaders have remained united on the fundamental issues, from the withdrawal negotiations with the United Kingdom to standing together against external threats, whether it is Russia’s continued aggression in Ukraine or fundamental challenges to the global trading system.

Due to a strong belief in the Union as the framework for member states’ common future, Europe remains a positive point of reference for the world, from championing the Paris Agreement to combat climate change to promoting the rules-based international order with free and fair trade at its centre.

Internally, the EU needs to invest more in the protection of our people against security threats, illegal migration and uncontrolled globalisation. Tough negotiations continue to limit the damage to citizens, businesses and member states arising from the UK’s departure on 29 March 2019.

And there is still much to do to strengthen economic and monetary union, advance co-operation on defence issues and develop a sensible, crisis-resilient migration policy.

EuropeanCouncilMay16toJune18 (pdf)

The Future UK-EU Relationship

The Government today (23 July 2018) published a White Paper, The Future UK-EU Relationship presented as a series of slides and may be an attempt to summarise the formal 104 page White Paper “The future relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union” issued earlier.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-future-uk-eu-relationship

This proposal builds on the vision for our future relationship set out by the Prime Minister at Mansion House and in Munich, and is comprised of four parts:

  • economic partnership
  • security partnership
  • cross-cutting and other cooperation
  • institutional arrangements

The Future UK-EU Relationship (pdf)
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/728135/THE_FUTURE_UK-EU_RELATIONSHIP.pdf

Philip Hammond’s speech 07 March 2018

The Chancellor of the Exchequer, Philip Hammond’s speech on financial services at HSBC on 07 March 2018.

https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/chancellors-hsbc-speech-financial-services

Here’s a transcript

It’s great to be here in Canary Wharf, and I am grateful to HSBC for hosting me. But I am conscious that holding this event in London risks feeding the prejudice that financial services is just a London business when, in fact, of course it is a vibrant part of the economy across the length and breadth of Britain with over two-thirds of financial services jobs outside London and significant financial services hubs in Edinburgh, Leeds, Bristol, Belfast, Birmingham and Bournemouth, to name but a few.

On Friday, the Prime Minister set out the UK’s vision for its future economic partnership with the European Union in a speech which answered the call to set out “what we want” while being clear that we understand this is a negotiation, where both sides will need to give and take. As the PM said, our task, together with our European partners, is to deliver a Brexit that works for the UK and for the EU. A partnership that protects supply chains and established trade relationships that backs businesses, safeguards jobs and promotes the shared European values that we all hold.

And the first step will be delivering on the Implementation Period which was agreed as a fundamental part of the deal on Withdrawal issues that we did in December and which we expect to be formalised at the March European Council meeting. This Implementation Period is essential if we – and by “we”, I mean all of us, businesses and citizens, in all 28 countries – are to benefit from a smooth pathway to a future partnership between the UK and the EU. Nowhere will this be more important than in Financial Services, where we must work together to avoid the potential risks to financial stability that could arise if we faced a cliff-edge in March 2019. But for the Implementation Period to deliver the smooth transition we all want to see, it needs to be effective.

That means our regulators working together so that businesses – especially regulated businesses – are able to plan on the basis of it. Giving full and meaningful effect to what we agreed in December delivering clarity and certainty to businesses and citizens across Europe.

The PM was clear in her speech that after we have left the EU, we’ll be outside the Single Market and the Customs Union but equally, we’ll be free to cooperate closely with partners, including the EU, where it is in our mutual interest to do so. Financial services is such an area where we can, and should, collaborate closely recognising that a future economic partnership will always need to ensure a fair balance of the rights and obligations associated with market access.

Today I want to build on the vision the Prime Minister delivered on Friday. I want to explain why it makes sense, for both the UK and the EU, that we continue to collaborate closely on cross-border financial services. I want to challenge the assertion that Financial Services cannot be part of a free trade agreement to set-out why it is in the interest of both the UK and the EU27 to ensure that EU businesses and citizens can continue to access the UK Financial Services hub and how this is not a zero-sum game, where any loss of market share in London is automatically a gain to another EU Capital. And I want to describe what a future financial services component of a comprehensive trade partnership agreement could look like.

Theresa May’s speech at the 2018 Munich Security Conference

by Politicker 0 Comments

Prime Minister Theresa May’s speech at the 2018 Munich Security Conference.

For more than half a century, this conference has brought nations together from Europe and across the Atlantic to forge our common security. The fundamental values we share – respect for human dignity, human rights, freedom, democracy and equality – have created common cause to act together in our shared interest. The rules-based system we helped to develop has enabled global cooperation to protect those shared values.

Today as globalisation brings nations closer together than ever before, we face a host of new and growing threats that seek to undermine those rules and values. As internal and external security become more and more entwined – with hostile networks no longer only rooted in state-based aggression and weapons designed not just to be deployed on the battlefield but through cyberspace – so our ability to keep our people safe depends ever more on working together. That is reflected here today in the world’s largest gathering of its kind, with representatives of more than seventy countries.

For our part, the United Kingdom has always understood that our security and prosperity is bound to global security and prosperity. We are a global nation – enriching global prosperity through centuries of trade, through the talents of our people and by exchanging learning and culture with partners across the world. And we invest in global security knowing this is how we best protect our people at home and abroad.

That is why we are the second largest defence spender in NATO, and the only EU member to spend 2 per cent of our GDP on defence as well as 0.7 per cent of our Gross National Income on international development. And it is why we will continue to meet these commitments.

PM’s Speech at Davos 2018

by Politicker 0 Comments

Theresa May, the Prime Minister, addressed the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland on the 25 January 2018.

Last year, on this platform, I argued that the benefits of free trade were not being felt by all. And I warned that the failure of political and business leaders to address this threatened to undermine popular support for the entire rules based system on which our global security and prosperity depends. But I also argued that we could change this. Not by turning our backs on free trade or the global rules based system – which together have delivered the greatest advances in prosperity we have ever known. But rather by doubling down on them and acting to ensure that the global economy works for everyone.

One year on, I believe there are grounds for optimism. Global growth has continued to strengthen, with the IMF estimating that global output last year grew by 3.7%. The populism of the Far Left and Far Right has not made the progress that some had predicted. And in the UK, we have seen productivity rising, unemployment at its lowest rate for over 40 years and more and more examples of government and business working together to bring new jobs and opportunities to communities across our country.

We have also seen important progress on global trade. The UK has been at the forefront of championing new trade deals, including the EU’s deals with Canada and Japan. The G20 has agreed commitments to tackle overcapacity in steel and the World Trade Organisation has made progress towards launching plurilateral discussions on digital trade.

And as we leave the European Union, the UK will continue to be a global advocate of free trade. Pushing for progress on WTO discussions; seeking to bring new partners to the table – and, of course, after we have left the EU, developing new bilateral deals with countries across the world. But there is much more to be done by the whole international community. And, frankly, too often our rhetoric in support of free trade here in Davos is not matched by our actions. The commitments on steel must be implemented.

css.php